George’s Reality

 
This is the house where George's family lives along with five other families.

This is the house where George’s family lives along with five other families.

I’m going to go ahead and write this while the feelings are so fresh within me. It’s either that or lecture my kids who just came in fighting over which ipad game to play.

I just went with George to see where he lives. I now feel I can never complain about any discomfort in my life… ever. My heart is so heavy as I think about all the sweet, smiley faces that greet me on the street, living in such absolute misery. There is nothing comforting about their home. You could never call it your refuge. Every day is a struggle, with no hope of change in sight.

George’s home is right next to the church. These pictures could be duplicated for the entire area that the church ministers to. These are the homes of our sponsored school children.

When we drove up I thought, “It looks so old, so broken and dirty.” I assumed the entire building was his. However, I soon found out his mom rents one room here. She pays $20 a month to live in this one room with four adults and six children. Just recently George and his cousin got the landlord to block off a portion of a room for him and his older cousin to rent. There is no running water or electricity. They must go to the community pump daily to get their water.

As heavy as my heart feels after visiting George’s reality, I have a sense of hope knowing that George now has a high school degree. He is determined to get a degree in mining engineering and with that he can change the future of his entire family. It makes me think of what Mother Teresa was known for saying, “I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the waters to create many ripples.” The need here is daunting. I know Liberia Now is limited in who it can help, but when one child in a family gets educated it will change their family’s life and their future. The same way one micro finance loan can have a ripple affect for the owner, his family, his customers and employees.

I’m leaving Liberia encouraged by the progress I have seen here since I last visited five years ago. Yes, there is still much to do, but I’m going to look at this the way my Liberian friends do and say, “To God be the glory for the great things He has done!” Kelly Tippit

George with his mom and some family members in their 17 by 11 foot room which has been Goerge’s home since he was 7. The bed is a piece of foam. There is no door to the main house or to their room. They use a blanket to cover the entrance.

George with his mom and some family members in their 17 by 11 foot room which has been Goerge’s home since he was 7. The bed is a piece of foam. There is no door to the main house or to their room. They use a blanket to cover the entrance.

The hole in the ceiling which leaks during the rainy season (April-October)

The hole in the ceiling which leaks during the rainy season (April-October)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The common area for all the tenants to cook their meals over an open wood burning stove.

The same area that is used by all six families to wash dishes and their clothes.

 The common area for all the tenants to cook their meals over an open wood burning stove.


The common area for all the tenants to cook their meals over an open wood burning stove.

 

The public restroom for the two homes side by side, where all 11 families live, with no water or electricity.

The public restroom for the two homes side by side, where all 11 families live, with no water or electricity.

The toilet, which is just a hole in the ground and no door. Here you bring your own water to wash yourself.

The toilet, which is just a hole in the ground and no door. Here you bring your own water to wash yourself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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